Saturday, May 12, 2018

Space Probe (a villanelle)--By Nick Spargo--United Kingdom

Space Probe (a villanelle)

Alone I travel, no-one listening for my cry;
Returning from the stars across uncounted years,
How many million miles from home am I?

My path preset, a stubborn course I fly,
The echoing silence madness in my ears.
Alone I travel, no-one listening for my cry.

The barren ether mocks my efforts as I try
To voice my dread, the essence of my fears;
How many million miles from home am I?

Across unmeasured time, unending space, I ply
My monotonous trade, punctuated by my unshed tears;
Alone I travel, no-one listening for my cry.

Again into the void I send my soundless cry,
Is anybody there? Anyone who hears?
How many million miles from home am I?

A misplaced thought, a misfiled note am I,
Forgotten victim of the dusty, unforgiving years.
Alone I travel, no-one listening for my cry
How many million miles from home am I?

Nick Spargo writes poetry, short stories and monologues. He has been published extensively and has won a number of prizes with his work. He lives in the South-West of England.

13 comments:

  1. a very difficult form, I know, but you've done a great job here, Nick - love this thoughtful piece

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    1. Thanks very much, Jack, I've always loved villanelles ever since I first read 'Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night'.

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  2. I agree with Jack, it isn't easy to write a villanelle. Wonderful work Nick

    Best wishes,
    Inge

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    1. Inge, I so pleased that you liked it. You're right, writing a villanelle isn't easy, but then writing any poem is a challenge. That's why Whispers is so important, and all the hard work that you Karen and Jack do to keep everything functioning is a poem in its own right.

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  3. Nick,
    I have always anted to attempt a villanelle, but I could never get a good alternating rhyme sequence together to do it. You have made a splendid job at it!
    Your new friend,
    David Fox

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  4. David,
    Thank you for your kind words; I've found that if I can get the two repeated lines sorted first, then usually a bit of juggling (occasionally brute force) will make it work.

    Thanks again for taking the time to give me your thoughts,
    Nick

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  5. It's quite an interesting piece, but I don't quite understand why you have anthropomorphized a machine.

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    1. Byron,

      Today we have computers which 40 years ago would have been pure science fiction. Already we are seeing the development of so-called Artificial Intelligence so in 500 or 1000 years time what will we have then?

      I don't think it is beyond conjecture that we will have machines with original thoughts and perhaps even emotions. We may even see a blending of human and machine, anthropomorphisation could well be unnecessary.

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  6. Hi Nick. Thank you for sharing "Space Probe." I enjoyed reading it. Continued blessings!

    -MJ
    (www.creativeinspirationspp.blogspot.com)

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    1. Hi Maurice,

      Thank you for your kind words, I'm glad you enjoyed Space Probe.

      Nick

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  7. Dear Nick,
    I just enjoyed this away from home trip I took with you.
    Knight Writer

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  8. Hello Yancy,
    I'm pleased that you enjoyed space probe; I know this may sound a bit crazy, but sometimes I find myself wondering if the journey ever ended.
    Nick

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  9. Nick, I like how you update the theme with this venerable form. Bravo!

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