Friday, June 17, 2016

rain--By David J. Kelly--Ireland

rain
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Why do you have no love
for the rain? You should thirst for it.
There is no yang of sun
without the yin of rain.
How can you see a colour’s full
depth and breadth and height
under a cloudless sky?
It is only after nourishing rain
that plants show their true selves.
Only then that we can see green
has a rainbow of its own.
Some places have rainy seasons,
but the rain seasons us all.
Dew and mist, storms and showers,
let some rain into your heart.

David J. Kelly is an animal ecologist based in Dublin, Ireland. While his day job revolves around science writing, his light poetry and Japanese verse forms (haiku, tanka, haibun and haiga) have been published in a number of journals and anthologies. He aspires to publish a book of poetry one day, when he has enough suitable material. David is a member of The British Haiku Society and Haiku Ireland.

7 comments:

  1. A timely reminder to remember the rain, since I only remember the sunshine! A enjoyable piece. Ralph

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  2. David,
    I like the rain, so long as it's not on me! Great poem.
    Your friend,
    David Fox

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  3. I love " the rain seasons us all." Oh I see Cindy commented on that too. I like your poem very much. We don't often think about the rain. How nourishing and nurturing.

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  4. Very well stated, David. I don't mind the rain at all, especially when it is poetically described like you did. Thank you for sharing and continued blessings!

    -MJ (www.tgbtgpublictions.com)

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  5. David, your insight into one of the most treasured elements on this planet is cherished by me. The ending of your poem says it all! I have always adored rain and I enjoyed reading your poem about rain immensely. I couldn't agree more! Blessings, Connie

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  6. Thank you all for your kind words. This poem was inspired by a 'soft' morning in Dublin - a steady light rain. I was struck by how much colourful detail appeared in the garden, when it was illuminated by the 'greyer' light of clouds, rather than direct sunlight. I'm glad the idea has translated into a poem so many of you enjoyed. David

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