Friday, April 7, 2017

Partners in Poetry--By Sara Kendrick, United States and Jack Horne, England

A Winter Landscape
By Sara Kendrick, United States and Jack Horne, England

a southern winter
landscape framed by dark gray clouds
pines sigh mellow tunes
a small boy laughs as he runs
splashing in muddy puddles

white ice spews from ground
as temperature plummets
peach blossoms turn brown
a gray haired man shakes his head
and buys tulips for his wife

a spring bouquet sits
in a lovely vase gone dry
tulip petals fall
a kitten smashes the vase
and leaps from the windowsill

grandmother awakes
a small boy and his kitten
run outside to play
donning a yellow rain coat
against the winter landscape

25 comments:

  1. Sara and Jack,
    A very nice collaboration poem!
    Yours truly,
    David Fox

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    1. Thanks so much for your encouraging comments..Sara

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  2. Enjoyed the read,Sara and Jack! A well written collaborative poem.All the best, Gert

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    1. Your reading and taking time to comment is so uplifting.

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  3. Disappointed that the poem didn't lead anywhere; it left me looking for more.You both kept the same verse shape which is encouraging. Sorry if this sounds negative. Until the next one!
    Ralph.

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    1. Maybe the next time we can lead you to join the little boy into a muddy puddle..Thanks for dropping by and taking time to comment..Sara

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  4. Dear U.S. Citizen Sara and English Jack, I like the fact
    it stuck to the title "Winter Landscape. I loved the
    people animal painted pictures of this Poem.
    Refreshing writing.
    Yancy

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    1. Thanks so much for reading and giving your thoughts about the work. The cold wet scene did not daunt the little boy's spirit..Sara

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    2. Yes, I enjoyed his splashing in muddy puddles
      Yancy

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    3. Little boys do love that mud and some grown men..Sara

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  5. Dear Sara and Jack,
    Really like the way your treated your theme of Winter Landscape. As spring approaches your poem bids a fond farewell to that season as it opens the door for spring to take up residence.
    Thank you,
    Michael

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    1. Spring has sprung here with summer warmth hanging onto the apron strings..Sara.Thanks for dropping by and for including us in this part of Whispers..

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  6. If I can feel the atmosphere in a poem, than it's a good one.
    This poem makes the scenery vivid. Congrats poets

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    1. Daginne, Thanks for your visit to our work..I appreciate you taking time to read and comment..Your encouraging comments..Sara

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  7. Thanks to everyone for their kind comments & thank you to Sara for writing with me

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    1. Jack, Thanks for writing with me..It was an interesting endeavour..Sara

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  8. Dear Sara and Jack,

    Thank you for sharing this poem with its interesting perspective. I appreciate the joy you are at whispers and in the writing community at large.

    Blessings always,
    Karen

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    1. Thanks for the invitation to join the group..I enjoy reading other writers..Sara

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  9. I like how you wrote this poem in flashes of imagery, Sara and Jack. The ending is a subtle attempt at nudging our own imagination. Best regards // paul

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    1. Paul,I am so glad that you like our flashes of imagery. I hope your imagination filled with great ideas..Sara

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  10. I really enjoyed this a lot, thanks for sharing it with us.

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    1. Peggy, It was a delight to write..Sara..Thanks for stopping by..

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  11. PLAYFUL, SURPRISING--DUN WORK. I like the wonderful (clear and detailed parallel structure in the first 3 stanzas (the grey/dark/cold frame set in 1st 2 lines, the movement into activity and "blooming"in the remainder of each stanza, and the graceful way the whole poem parallels that one-stanza structure by the "rebirth" movement in the 4th stanza. It is like the poem says "no" to death--and very effectively. Great job!

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